Panasonic Corporation has developed a security system which helps prevent cyberattacks on vehicles as part of a plan to benefit from growing global demand for connected cars.

The new system is for internet connected vehicles and uses software to detect system abnormality.

Panasonic and automakers plan to have dedicated teams in place to monitor cars around the clock, the Japanese electronics giant said.

Panasonic set up a mock surveillance centre in Tokyo in October 2021 to demonstrate how a cyberattack would be detected, using a demonstration car located in nearby Osaka to simulate a cyberattack which took over the driving controls.

A Panasonic spokesman said: “If a car’s computerised control system is taken over during driving, it can lead to fatal accidents. Abnormalities need to be detected at an early stage to prevent this. Our system is capable of doing just that.”

Working in coordination, the detection teams can remotely upgrade a vehicle software system early on to help prevent an attack, whether the car is located in Japan or overseas.

The Japanese government is tightening regulations on vehicles with driving control systems that can be updated by wireless connection. Such vehicles sold after June 2022 would have to undergo additional checks by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, to ensure they have a system which manages cybersecurity.

Panasonic said it would work with IT companies to “make this system an industry standard”.