PSA Groupe says it is "very comfortable" with the results of emissions testings carried out at the behest of the French government in the wake of the Volkswagen diesel scandal.

France unilaterally launched its own emissions validation programme ahead of any direction from the European Union in the guise of the 'Commission Royale,' instigated by the secretary of state for the environment, Segolene Royale, who has previously run for president.

The commission is still conducting its rigorous testing but PSA says it is happy with results from its 16 models out of 80 currently being evaluated.

"We have got good results - we explained [to the commission] how our system is functioning," PSA quality and engineering director Gilles le Borgne told just-auto at this week's Paris show. "We are comfortable with the results.

"The commission is ongoing - we feel comfortable we have the best system by far."

The engineering chief highlighted PSA's drive to slash CO2 emissions to 91g by 2020 - an even stricter target than that mandated by Brussels of 95g - while it is also forensically looking to achieve a co-efficient factor of 1.5 for NOX - a figure it is aiming to achieve next year and ahead of 2020 regulations.

The automaker is also seeking to match China's ambitious targets of five litres of fuel per 100km in four years time, followed by a further one litre per 100km cut by 2025.

"We have improvement of internal combustion engines - we are doing a lot in this area," added le Borgne. "We are connecting the new generation of engines to the new regulations that will take place next year.

"We have a clear track record bringing new technologies to market. With [the] current portfolio, we are leading the game in terms of CO2 emissions in Europe.

"You have to understand for PSA what is important is to have a large portfolio of technologies. No-one can really forecast what is going to happen - no-one. We can face all the energy mix which will happen because we have the answer.

"Europe is one of the most demanding [emissions regulations] regions in the world - of course it is tough."

PSA insists its raft of emissions technologies was initiated before news of Volkswagen's travails broke last September with technology cycle plans put in place ahead of Wolfsburg's diesel scandal.

To avoid any "loopholes" as PSA puts it, the automaker is looking to work with a non-governmental organisation to help it define a robust analysis of real driving testing.

"There is no regulation for CO2 today, it is not planned, so it is really what makes our initiative unique," said le Borgne. "We are delivering real driving emissions results.

"This is a process we are following for CO2 and next year for NOx and the rest of [the] pollutants."