Provisional figures just published for the period January-June 2001 show new-car sales in Ireland are down compared to the same period of 2000 (129,194 units this year compared to179, 034 last year) but they are ahead of the 1999 mid-year result of 124,914 units. Within the industry a comparison with 1999 is regarded as more valid.

'The so-called Millennium Effect and the Double Zero number-plate produced the biggest new-car market ever seen here, a wonderful and unprecedented result for our industry, but it was a freak year', according to Fiat Auto Ireland's new CEO Paolo Gagliardo. He points out that most industry observers and analysts now predict that the market this year will be more in line with a steady trend of growth started in the early '90s. According to Gagliardo, 'This consistent upward trend reflects the increasing affluence in the country and I believe that the year will close with total sales somewhere between 160-165,000 units. That would be another great year for new car sales'.

Over the first six months of the current year sales declined by 27% compared to 2000, but sales are 3.3% better than for the first half year in 1999. 'The normal seasonality of the Irish market -with the vast majority of sales recorded in the first half year - will come into play again his year and therefore we are fairly confident of our predictions. However in 1999 the year ended very strongly so we reckon that we are unlikely to reach the total of over 174,000 recorded that year', Gagliardo commented.

The 'Top 10' for the six-month period Jan.- June 2001 (with sales percentage change on the first half of 2000) were:-

Marque
Market Share
Unit Sales
% Change
1.Ford
11.4%
14,673
-28.1
2.Toyota
10.6%
13,728
-29.5
3.Nissan
10.4%
13,478
-31.0
4. VW
10.2%
13,220
-18.8
5. Opel
9.4%
12,092
-31.3
6.Renault
6.6%
8,560
-23.6
7. FIAT
6.6%
8,510
-35.3
8. Peugeot
4.9%
6,288
-14.8
9.Hyundai
2.9%
3,734
-37.0
10.M.-Benz
2.8%
3,560
+5.6%


To view related research reports, please follow the links below:-

The world's car manufacturers: A financial and operating review

Automotive regional report: Western Europe