Three vehicles competing in the 17th annual Michelin One Lap of America race will feature Johnson Controls' (NYSE: JCI) innovative PSI(TM) - Pressure Safety Information system to ensure optimal tire pressure for vehicle performance and safety both on the track and the open road.

The 2000 One Lap of America race -- which begins May 7 in South Haven, Michigan and ends there May 13 -- consists of seven high-speed racing events at some of the most famous tracks in America. It is a 4,200-mile trip through several states in between individual races. The One Lap of America has been called "one of the most unique and difficult events in motorsports," and challenges the skills of two-person race teams and their vehicles.

"This demanding week of track racing and travel will once again provide an opportunity to show our PSI product in 'real-world' and extreme conditions," said Bob Ellis, vice president of brand management for Johnson Controls. "We're excited to be featuring PSI for the second consecutive year in a performance vehicle application at the One Lap of America race."

PSI debuted in 1998 as a future electronics product from Johnson Controls and will see its first original-equipment application later this year, on a 2001 model-year vehicle. PSI is an innovative, tire-pressure monitoring system developed by Johnson Controls that enhances vehicle safety, tire performance and driver convenience. The system includes a radio-frequency transmitter in each tire, receiver circuitry and an in-vehicle electronic display that signals a driver when pressure in any tire falls below optimum levels. Loss of tire pressure is indicated with an audible signal and an alert message on a visual display.

The combination of PSI and Michelin performance tires demonstrates the importance of tire-pressure monitoring for vehicles on the road, and on the race track. The application of this technology at the One Lap of America competition demonstrates PSI's capabilities on actual U.S. streets and highways.

At last year's One Lap of America, Johnson Controls' PSI saved One Lap of America participant and professional race car driver Terri Hundertmark from what was a potentially dangerous situation. During a stop at the Texas Motor Speedway, Hundertmark was alerted by the Johnson Controls PSI system that the right front tire of her Mustang Cobra SVT was underinflated.

"The PSI system also showed me that I was losing pressure in the tire and allowed me to refill it before running on the track," said Hundertmark. "Low air pressure would have affected the performance of the car and my safety on the track. This system is so useful."

The PSI system also came to Hundertmark's aid during two other instances during the week. "On the track, PSI saved me time, on the street it may have saved my life," she said.

Participants in the 2000 Michelin One Lap of America will compete at seven world-class racing venues in 15 events. Teams will travel across the country, making stops at racing venues in Michigan (2), Georgia, Florida, Virginia, Connecticut and Ohio. They will be on the road nearly 24 hours each day. When traveling on public highways, drivers will be restricted to legal speed limits. Awards will be given in 11 different classes, and for overall achievement. The event benefits a number of charities, including Ronald McDonald Children's Charities, The National Marrow Donor Program, Laps to Conquer MS, and the Transplant Recipients International Organization.

Michelin North America is a major producer of tires for cars and trucks, construction equipment, airplanes, and space shuttles.

The Plymouth, Michigan-based automotive business of Johnson Controls -- which employs more than 65,000 people at 275 facilities worldwide -- achieved US$12.1 billion in sales for the 1999 fiscal year. In model-year 2000, it will supply interior products for more than 23 million vehicles.

Johnson Controls, Inc. is a global market leader in automotive systems and facility management and control. In the automotive market, it is a major supplier of seating and interior systems, and batteries. For non-residential facilities, Johnson Controls provides building control systems and services, energy management and integrated facility management. Johnson Controls, founded in 1885, has headquarters in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Its sales for 1999 totaled US$16.1 billion.