Aston Martin takes another look at evolving as an innovative luxury goods provider, rather than as  simply a high-end spprts car manufacturer

Aston Martin takes another look at evolving as an innovative luxury goods provider, rather than as simply a high-end spprts car manufacturer

Aston Martin has presented its Lagonda Vision Concept, which it says heralds the beginning of a new range of emission-free luxury vehicles under the Lagonda brand. Production is planned to start in 2021.

The company says Lagonda aims to be the 'world's first zero emission luxury brand' that will 'confound traditional thinking and take full advantage of the latest advances in electrification and autonomous driving technologies'.

"We believe people associate luxury in their cars with a certain traditional and even old-fashioned approach because, to date, that is all that's been available to them," said Aston Martin CEO Andy Palmer. "Lagonda exists to challenge that thinking and prove that being modern and luxurious are not mutually exclusive concepts."

The Lagonda 'Vision Concept' shown in Geneva is described as a near future study that previews the design language that could potentially be seen in production Lagonda models as soon as 2021. Alongside the new concept, two 40 per cent scale models were displayed, one coupe concept and one SUV concept, to illustrate how the Lagonda design language could be adapted for the future.

"The Lagonda Vision Concept is an incredibly bold design statement," said Aston Martin EVP and Chief Creative Officer, Marek Reichman. "The electrification revolution means there is no longer any need for horse and carriage design, and our new concept shows the scope of design opportunities that open up once you no longer need to provide space for a large power source directly in front of the passenger compartment. In the Lagonda Vision Concept, the batteries occupy the floor of the car. Everything above that line belongs to us."

The Vision Concept comes with room inside for four adults, each of two metres height or more, to 'stretch out in luxurious comfort'.

"Lagonda has no need to occupy a huge amount of road space or make an ostentatious wealth statement," says Reichman. "It is like comparing Concorde to the first class cabin of a conventional airliner. By ditching traditional architecture like Parthenon grilles and massive frontal areas, and by using electrical power, Lagonda design can still be distinctive and luxurious without being grandiose. It offers its customers a thoroughly modern, emission-free form of super-luxurious mobility."

Chauffeur-driven or automated?

"For owners of true luxury cars, autonomy has existed for over a century, in a carbon-based form called a chauffeur," said Palmer. "We imagine most Lagonda customers will choose to be driven, but whether by a person or a computer will be up to them. And if they want to drive themselves, the car will ensure that is a delightful and memorable experience too. Lagonda will provide that choice."

The Lagonda Vision Concept has been configured to accept powerful solid state electric batteries enabling it to cover up to 400 real world miles between charges. The concept has also has been designed to be compatible with the latest wireless conductive charging technology.

Aston Martin says Lagonda will use 'emergent technologies not to isolate their occupants from the experience of travel as do others, but to immerse them in its magic, enabling a whole new generation of enthusiasts and connoisseurs to rediscover the long lost joy of the journey'.

"There are some excellent products in the luxury car market today, but they are tied by their brands to traditional design execution," notes Palmer. "Similarly, if you look at the most modern, technologically advanced cars on the market, they are defined by their technologies. By contrast

"Lagonda will be entirely strategic in its approach of technology, using it as a means to attain its goal of creating the world's first ultra-modern luxury cars, and never as an end in itself."

Lagonda will be entirely strategic in its approach of technology, using it as a means to attain its goal of creating the world's first ultra-modern luxury cars, and never as an end in itself."