Blog: Dave LeggettUK market/motoring stats

Dave Leggett | 1 May 2008

I've been sent a very well produced booklet from the IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) Trust. You can download it for free (below). It contains plenty of data on the UK but there's a section on international comparisons at the back. It's a good summary compiled from a variety of sources. I defy anyone to not raise their eyebrows over a few of the stats within it. Here are a few:

Today's new lorry (what us Brits sometimes call freight trucks) is quieter than a new car made before 1982.

The years 1934, 1941 and 1966 were the worst years for deaths on Britain's roads. Fatal and serious injuries peaked in 1966 and then began falling. Road deaths in cars and also pedestrians killed on the roads have gone down sharply since 1990. A recent significant decline in 'slight injuries' began as recently as 1998.

Which country comes out worst on road deaths per thousand population? Russia, by quite a big margin (careful on those Moscow streets if you're going to watch the big football game there later this month). And within the UK, maybe take a little more care when travelling in Northern Ireland which comes out worst among the regions in terms of KSI (Killed or Seriously Injured) rate on the roads per 100,000 population..

Over the last twenty years or so (comparing 1985 with 2006) annual UK sales of cars with engine size 1.8L-2.499L have trebled (0.3m pa to 1m) while sales of cars with engine size less than 1.2L have more than halved (0.44m to 0.18m). I wonder what that table will look like in twenty years time...

IAM Motoring Facts


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