Toyota is investing in SE Asia where it sees good long-term market growth prospects

Toyota is investing in SE Asia where it sees good long-term market growth prospects

Toyota has provided more detail on plans to reorganise its Malaysian manufacturing footprint and, as earlier reported by just-autoadd a new passenger vehicle manufacturing plant.

UMW Toyota Motor Sdn. Bhd. (UMWT) will discontinue the manufacturing of passenger vehicles at its existing plant by early 2019, using that location instead as a dedicated commercial vehicle plant. A new plant will exclusively manufacture passenger vehicles, Toyota has said.

Set to be built in Klang, in the state of Selangor, the new plant will have an annual production capacity of 50,000 vehicles. Toyota says that approximately 49 billion yen will be invested in the exclusive passenger vehicle manufacturing plant, which is also planned to begin operations in early 2019.

Toyota describes the new plant as part of the next step in its efforts to create competitive plants using innovative production technologies such as freely extensible lines and compact painting booths; these manufacturing features which will also be introduced in Toyota's new Mexican plant and new Chinese lines, it said.

By dividing production of commercial and passenger vehicles between the existing plant and the new one, Toyota says that processes and distribution will be optimised based on vehicle structure and size, which, in turn, will increase productivity in the existing plant.

Toyota Managing Officer Tatsuro Takami said: "This plant is another of our efforts to create new, competitive plants, following the decisions made last year to create a new plant in Mexico and a new line in China, and the opening of two new engine plants this year in Indonesia and Brazil. In addition to introducing cutting edge production technologies, we will dedicate ourselves to developing the personnel who support the making of ever-better cars. By doing this, we will provide high quality vehicles to Malaysian customers through UMWT."